Achingly unacceptable: the bad language that bugs me

Avatar do usuário jlmmelo 2385 8 66
A great linguist, Ferdinand de Saussure, once wrote: “Time changes all things; there is no reason why language should escape this universal law.” That truth anyone who thinks about language must immediately recognise.

Professional linguists regard such change as neutral, an inherent fact of language. Who today speaks the BBC English of yesteryear, far less the English of Dickens or Jane Austen? But many language users – and we are all language users – give vent to vehement frustration over the constant changes taking place. One has only to read the letters in newspapers, or hear irate callers-in to radio programmes, to understand that fact: “‘Going forward’ sets my teeth on edge”; “What kind of word is ‘gotten’? It makes me shudder,” and so on. ...

to wed: Who else but journalists would use this ridiculous, archaic word? ...

haitch: The eighth letter of the alphabet [h] is pronounced “aitch”. Look it up in a dictionary if you don’t believe me. ...

Read all... The Guardian
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Avatar do usuário PPAULO 40955 6 32 717
The British somehow stick to rules, and are a bit fussy about the language than the American people.
Anyway, there´s no way to keep English unchanged, we only hope that not too much...