Como dizer "A torra do café" em inglês

Você notou que a torra do café que compramos melhorou?

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7 respostas
Did you noticed that the roasting process of the coffe we bought has improved?

Acredito que também estaria certo: Did you notice the improvement of the roasting on the coffee we bought?

"Roasting is a complex science that enables the extraction of the best that a cup of coffee has to offer."
Marcio_Farias 1 24 213
DaniloAdler escreveu:Did you noticed...
DA, here in all likelihood you must have meant, "Did you notice..." instead of "Did you noticed..."
Henry Cunha 3 18 183
As an addendum, our common everyday habit is to speak of the roast, but not of the process, which is something only experts seem to know about. So we might say "Did you notice this is now a better (an improved) roast?" Ultimately we are talking of the taste, or aroma, so we might also say "Did you notice this roast is now better tasting?" or something of the kind.
Henry, you didn't use the word "coffee" in your examples, but if I wanted to use it, was it for me just to add "on coffee" after the word "roast"?
Henry Cunha 3 18 183
Simon Vasconcelos escreveu:Henry, you didn't use the word "coffee" in your examples, but if I wanted to use it, was it for me just to add "on coffee" after the word "roast"?
Well, if we know we're talking about coffee, --for example if we're standing in front of the coffee display at a supermarket-- then we don't need the word coffee. But otherwise the common expression is "coffee roast". So,

"Did you notice this coffee roast is now better tasting?"

We're distinguishing between various approaches to the roasting of coffee. In the same vein we could speak of different beef roasts, although they all end up being roastbeef. Does that make sense?
It's strange that a roastbeef is a rare piece of meat. Those who don't know what kind of food it is will think it is a well-done piece of meat.
Henry Cunha 3 18 183
Simon Vasconcelos escreveu:It's strange that a roastbeef is a rare piece of meat. Those who don't know what kind of food it is will think it is a well-done piece of meat.
I think I know what you mean. Most people, I think, prefer to have roastbeef rare, or medium rare. But a roastbeef can be cooked rare, medium rare, medium, well done. It's a matter of taste, and perhaps a concern for food safety.

What I want to alert you to is that word order affects meaning here a little bit. A "rare piece of meat" usually means a piece of meat rarely found, or seen. It's an expression of frequency, used this way. If you want to speak of how well something is cooked, it's better to speak of "a cut of meat done rare, done medium, done well".