Como dizer "engolir sapo" em inglês

Avatar do usuário Ravenna 70 3
Exatamente como no meu OXFORD! ^^
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Avatar do usuário Flavia.lm 3960 1 9 90
Definição em português

Morder a língua
conter-se, reprimir-se, deixar de proferir um dito picante ou violento. (Michaelis Online)
conter-se ante alguma coisa que iria ser pronunciada; deixar de falar algo; calar-se (Houaiss Online)
Conter-se e não dizer o que já ia dizendo. (Aulete Online)

Engolir sapo
Michaelis não fornece tradução
tolerar coisas ou situações desagradáveis sem responder por incapacidade ou conveniência (Houaiss)
Ter de aceitar e suportar situação ou fatos desagradáveis, difíceis etc. (Aulete)

Português -> Inglês

Morder a língua (P>E)
Michaelis - morder a língua to bite one’s tongue
Oxford - não fornece tradução

Engolir sapo (P>E)
Michaelis - to swallow an insult.
Oxford Escolar - to bite your tongue

*** Até aqui, temos Michaelis e Oxford dando a mesma tradução "bite one's tongue" para as duas expressões, que, já vimos, têm significados diferentes.


Inglês - Inglês:

Longman
bite your tongue: to stop yourself from saying what you really think, even though this is difficult:
She should have bitten her tongue.

Macmillan
bite your tongue/lip
to stop yourself from saying something that might upset or annoy someone
I almost told her what I thought of her, but I bit my tongue.

Cambridge
bite your tongue
to stop yourself from saying something which you would really like to say
I wanted to tell him exactly what I thought of him, but I had to bite my tongue.

Oxford
bite your tongue
to stop yourself from saying something that might upset somebody or cause an argument, although you want to speak
I didn't believe her explanation but I bit my tongue.

Merriam-Webster
bite one's tongue : to hold back (as from a reluctance to offend) a remark one would like to make

Conclusão:
Gabi 1 x 0 Oxford Escolar


Por isso que digo que participar do fórum vale muito mais do que ter um bom dicionário.
Avatar do usuário Ravenna 70 3
LMAO Oxford got owned?!
I'm the editor of the Oxford Escolar, and I have given some thought to the translation of "engolir sapo", and had a good look at this thread. I am convinced, though, that our translation "to bite your tongue" is probably the best available, given that the meaning of "engolir sapo" (as quoted above) is that you have to stand something/somebody you do not want/like because you need to or because it is convenient.

tolerar coisas ou situações desagradáveis sem responder por incapacidade ou conveniência (Houaiss)

ter de aceitar e suportar situação ou fatos desagradáveis, difíceis etc. (Aulete)

The idiom "to bite your tongue" seems to me to be an ideal translation for this. While it is usually used in relation to speaking, it can also be used in the figurative sense of putting up with a situation you don't like because you have to.
Here is the definition of "bite your tongue" from the Advanced Learner's Dictionary, 9th edition (2010):

bite your tongue
to stop yourself from saying sth that might upset sb or cause an argument, although you want to speak
I didn't believe her explanation but I bit my tongue.
© Oxford University Press, 2010

I do accept that "morder a língua" has a slightly different meaning to "engolir sapo", but the fact is that in English there is only one expression which has to do for the semantic field covered by the two expressions in Portuguese. So that's why we would use the same translation for both expressions.

As regards what Gabi said regarding "to eat crow/humble pie", I don't think the meaning here is the same at all:

eat humble pie ( BrE )
( NAmE eat crow )
to say and show that you are sorry for a mistake that you made. From a pun on the old word umbles , meaning ‘offal’, which was considered to be food for poor people.
© Oxford University Press, 2010

I hope this has explained our position regarding this translation. And thank you for the interesting discussion. :-)
Avatar do usuário Donay Mendonça 56980 22 95 1360
Mark,

Welcome to the EE forum!


Thank you for your comment!
Avatar do usuário Flavia.lm 3960 1 9 90
Hi Mark

Oxford Escolar = best biligual dictionary for Brazilian students of English
EE forum = best forum for Brazilian students of English

So, it is very good to know now the two "best ones" can interact and exchange ideas.

Welcome to the forum.
Avatar do usuário Flavia.lm 3960 1 9 90
Let's stick to Oxford, then:

swallow something to accept insults, criticisms, etc. without complaining or protesting
I was surprised that he just sat there and swallowed all their remarks.
http://www.oxfordadvancedlearnersdictio ... ry/swallow

What about "grin and bear it"?

grin and bear it (only used as an infinitive and in orders) to accept pain, disappointment or a difficult situation without complaining
There's nothing we can do about it. We'll just have to grin and bear it.http://www.oxfordadvancedlearnersdictionary.com/dictionary/grin

BTW, I found some "swallowing toads" in Google :shock: but none from a reliable dictionary.
Thanks, Flavia.

Yes, I think I recall we considered "grin and bear it". It would certainly work OK in many cases. I think we felt bite your tongue was perhaps better as an all-purpose translation. What is easy to see from a bit of analysis of engolir sapo is that the expression is quite flexible ("engolir sapos", "engolir un sapo"...) and so naturally tends to generate quite a few different translations. For a dictionary of the size of the Escolar, therefore, our concern is to provide what we think is the best all-purpose translation - there just isn't space to go into much more detail than thatǃ

"Swallow" is of course very close in meaning too, but the problem here is that the English verb demands an object ("remarks" in the example from the Advanced Learner's Dictionary), and as that object miɡht well be different for each use of the Portuɡuese expression, the translation would not be so useful for learners of Enɡlishǃ

all the best

Mark
Avatar do usuário Gabi 785 1 1 15
So, to bite you tongue would be the equivalent to to "engolir sapo" and "morde a sua língua" (figurative)?

I understand the slightly differences between them ,but they can't be the same thing.
In Portuguese it is different and I think that if we translate in English like that it would give us a different meaning to the sentence.
You can swallow your pride, your remarks and so on, as Mark said, it's necessary to have an object if you follow flá's suggestion.
Flavia.lm escreveu:Let's stick to Oxford, then:

swallow something to accept insults, criticisms, etc. without complaining or protesting
I was surprised that he just sat there and swallowed all their remarks.
http://www.oxfordadvancedlearnersdictio ... ry/swallow


Even though is a bit trick and difficult to explain this in a pocket dictionary, it's important to be precise in a dictionary that so many people rely on as a good source of information.





Flavia.lm escreveu:grin and bear it (only used as an infinitive and in orders) to accept pain, disappointment or a difficult situation without complaining
There's nothing we can do about it. We'll just have to grin and bear it.http://www.oxfordadvancedlearnersdictionary.com/dictionary/grin


I think that grin and bear is about to "conformar-se com algo"


BTW,
Mark_Temple escreveu:As regards what Gabi said regarding "to eat crow/humble pie", I don't think the meaning here is the same at all:

eat humble pie ( BrE )
( NAmE eat crow )
to say and show that you are sorry for a mistake that you made. From a pun on the old word umbles , meaning ‘offal’, which was considered to be food for poor people.
© Oxford University Press, 2010


Actually that wasn't a suggestion of mine to "engolir sapo", I'd just explained to Ravenna what that means.
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OK, sorry. My mistake!