Como dizer "Refletir" em inglês

Dear friends,

I'd like to know if there is another way to say the following sentence:

Could you please inform whether your text is REFLECTING the policies of our corporation?

For me, as a brazilian, it looks ok; i can easily get the meaning. But is this correct for a native? The word "reflecting", in this context, sounds a little misused...

Thanks in advance!

Vinícius Silva

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20 respostas
Marcio_Farias 1 24 213
Gave "... your text mirrors the policies..." a lot of thought, but then someone else might come up with something better.
Henry Cunha 3 18 183
Vinicius,
Essa frase como escrita, em todo, fica com um tom um pouco esquisito em inglês. Gostaria de saber como vc expressaria a mesma coisa em português, antes de sugerir qlqr coisa. È menos a palavra "reflect", e mais o tom de "please inform." Regards
Flavia.lm 1 10 96
Henry

Eu acredito que ele queira dizer "Você poderia informar se seu texto reflete as políticas de nossa corporação/empresa?"

O locutor quer saber se o texto em questão está de acordo com o que consta nas normas/políticas da empresa.
Talvez "reflete" possa ser substituído por "expressa" ou "retrata".

Só não sei qual seria uma boa tradução.
Vinicius,

The use of the word "reflect" is correct in this sentence and so is the way the questions is posed:

Could you please inform whether your text is REFLECTING the policies of our corporation?

Think of it as a reflection in a mirror. So, if you boss is sending you this question, he or she wants to know if you have considered the corporation policies when you wrote the text. It does not mean that you are showing the policies but rather that the text was written taking these policies into consideration and thus reflect their context or intention.

Two different uses/meaning of the word "reflecting" below:

* I am reflecting on the meaning of life. (contemplating)
* Chapter 2 on the book is reflecting a way of life in small town America. (showing)

but careful, as if you say:

* Chapter 2 on the book is reflecting on a way of life in small town America. - that is a different meaning.!!

hope this helps and did't make matters more muddy.
Flavia.lm 1 10 96
Relendo a msg do Henry...

Qual o problema com "please inform"?
Donay Mendonça 22 107 1.6k
Pessoal,

Sugestão:

Could you please inform whether your text reflects the policies of our corporation?


Boa sorte!
Henry Cunha 3 18 183
Grammatically there's nothing wrong with the sentence. Stylistically it's not the way you phrase a (presumably) collegial question in English.

If you ask someone to "please inform whether [or not]", you're asking for a "yes" or "no" answer, which is probably not the intention of the person asking the question. If you're asking for an explanation "of the extent to which" a text reflects policy, then you might want to include those terms in your question. I'd like to see the question in Portuguese to ascertain the writer's intention.

The question, as posed, comes at you as being in the attack mode. Is this the intention of the writer?

Regards
Donay Mendonça 22 107 1.6k
Henry,

Entendo o argumento. Acredito que então possamos substituir "whether" por "how".

Could you please inform how your text reflects the policies of our corporation?


Valeu!
Henry Cunha 3 18 183
Hi Donay,
I`m not sure if this change removes the negative criticism that I find implicit in the question. I`m not saying you can`t ask it in this fashion, but it should be understood that the question will likely be considered adversarial. Perhaps the questioner is not concerned with diplomatic niceties, and that`s fine. Or perhaps the questioner is simply awkward in expressing himself in English. Until we see the Portuguese version, it`s difficult to tell.

Here`s my "nice" way of phrasing this kind of concern:

I am wondering if the text you have supplied is entirely consistent with company policy. I'd appreciate your comments as to whether my (our) concerns are warranted.

But it would be incumbent on the writer to spell out what problems were detected in the text.

So this takes us far from the original question of the appropriateness of the translation of a single de-contextualized sentence. We need Vinicius to reply. Regards
Don't want to be controversial, but I don't believe there is anything wrong with the sentence from a grammatical or style point of view:

Could you please inform whether your text is reflecting the policies of our corporation?

This would be a very common way that a colleague or superior might as a question on an e-mail or letter.

We should not think of writing in English as we do in Portuguese. One of the things I enjoy about writing in English is that the conventions of the language allows it to be brief and to the point without being consider unpolished. Whenever I write in Portuguese or Spanish, being an article or a business letter, it is always longer and far more flowery. The same message in English is always far shorter. In this context I see the above sentence as perfectly appropriate.

Just my opinion.
Flavia.lm 1 10 96
Henry, thank you very much for pointing this out.
If you ask someone to "please inform whether [or not]", you're asking for a "yes" or "no" answer, which is probably not the intention of the person asking the question.
I would never notice this 'criticism' that you mentioned. Reason: this is the way that any Brazilian would write this sentence (in Portuguese).

I am wondering if the text you have supplied is entirely consistent with company policy. I'd appreciate your comments as to whether my (our) concerns are warranted.
And, we wouldn't probably use this kind of structure (in this situation).
Flavia.lm 1 10 96
Maybe if the author of the sentence had written: "Inform whether your text ..." (imperative form) I would agree with Henry. But "Could you please..." is so polite!
Flavia.lm 1 10 96
I shouldn’t have written “agree with Henry”. Actually this is not a matter of agreeing or disagreeing, especially because I wouldn’t dare to say you’re wrong. I just wanted to show how a ‘simple’ question can be widely debated and how these small peculiarities can make all the difference for us (us = Brazilians students of English).
Henry Cunha 3 18 183
Well, in some thirty years of writing and receiving business correspondence in English, if someone (particularly) from within my publishing company had sent me a message with a sentence such as the one in question, I would consider it insultingly aggressive--not to mention imperious and demanding. It would mean that someone believes I either don't know company policy or have deliberately flouted it. The sentence is fine if this is the impression the writer wishes to convey. If not, it should be revised. There is a difference between the usual employment of "to inform" meaning "to notify" in English, and "informar" as "explain" in Portuguese. I don't see an issue of conciseness or flowery language here, only of usage.

I should add that "could you please," in this case, merely adds fuel to the fire. It's like prefacing an insult with agreeable language. (For ex: "Could I ask you to please shut up?")

I'm still waiting for Vinicius' Portuguese version... Cheers!
maryziller 1 2
I like Henry's suggestion. I really liked the mention of the "attack mode" tone. That's what is so great about this blog forum. You can learn important things that are not easily found in books. A more concise version would be "Please confirm whether your text reflects company policy." "Please verify whether your text reflects company policy."
Lu Interact escreveu:Vinicius,

The use of the word "reflect" is correct in this sentence and so is the way the questions is posed:

Could you please inform whether your text is REFLECTING the policies of our corporation?
I disagree with Lu Interact's interpretation of the tone of please inform and the grammar choice of the progressive tense in the example.

I think it would be better to use present tense than progressive because the progressive tense is used for an event or action occuring over a period of time, but here we are talking about a fact: the text is either in line with company policy or not.
I guess I still fail to understand why "please inform" is deemed to be an aggressive tone.

I believe that we agree that the sentence in question is correct and the only grey area is a mater of style and possibly context.

How is "please inform" in the sentences below different form the sentence in question?

* Please inform the authorities if you see a suspicious package.
* Could you please go outside and inform the crowd that the show has been delayed?
* Can someone please inform me if the show will take place tonight?

The above demand an action, but hardly aggressive.

The comparison in context between the use of "please" with the words "shut up" and "inform" - I fail to see this as well.

If it was changed to "please let me know" or "please advise", would that make it any less aggressive? I don't personally believe so but it is interesting to see different opinions.

I agree with Mary, this forum is great in getting colourful insight that one would not find in a book and I believe the discussion and differing opinions is very healthy.

Please excuse, I am not trying to be disagreeable, I this case I just fail to see how "please inform" used in this context can be deemed aggressive.
Flavia.lm 1 10 96
reopening

Could you please inform whether your text is REFLECTING the policies of our corporation?

Would that be fine to say:
"Would you please let me know whether your text is ECHOING the policies of our corporation?"

?
Henry Cunha 3 18 183
Flávia,

I am repeating what Mary said above: There isn't any reason for "is reflecting" when "reflects" does the job perfectly well. As to the actual verb "reflect," it's appropriate for the sentence.

Rereading all the posts, I remain frustrated at the difficulties in explaining why "please inform" or "could you please inform," etc., are awkward ways of soliciting an explanation -- as opposed to asking for a yes/no answer. And the originator of the post never clarified what exactly he meant.
Flavia.lm 1 10 96
Hello Henry
Yes, it is a pity that Vinicius never came back. But you don't need to worry, we can still explore his example. About the "inform" stuff, I transferred the discussion to Inform x Let sb know: Qual a diferença

Tks for pointing out that the present tense fits better than the continuous - I hadn't reread the whole thread :oops:

Do "echoes" work as good as "reflects"?
Henry Cunha 3 18 183
Hi Flávia
I'd forgotten there was another posting!
In my opinion "echoes" seems more imprecise, and perhaps a bit too flowery. I think of echoing as being an action that "repeats or imitates" the memory, or sound, of something. I prefer "reflect." One invokes a sound effect, the other a visual one. But it wouldn't be a serious issue if it were used here.