Como usar o May e o Might

Avatar do usuário Judy Friedkin 710 2 20
I would say there "may" be a difference in the correct usage of the grammar but no one says may anymore. In the US we use might , not may, in speaking. May is formal and you "may" find it in writing, but in common speech we use "might" May is used to ask permission. I think the problem we have is that you look in a book and I am not arguing against what you are finding but I am just telling what is used and what is not. No one says "may"any more here unless they are trying to be very formal. We just do not use it.
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Avatar do usuário Judy Friedkin 710 2 20
Some things that are acceptable now are not grammatically correct. For example. "It is I is correct grammatically because I is the predicate nominative and you need a pronoun in the subjective form. Me is an objective form . However, now it is considered acceptable to say it is me because of common usage. It is still not correct to say it is him, her, or them. Perhaps someday they will be acceptable also but not yet. Language constantly changes because of usage and I believe this is what has happened with might and may.
Avatar do usuário Henry Cunha 10000 3 16 177
It's misguided to think that there is a spoken English and a written English that exist in isolation from each other.

Look here: http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?co ... =10&share=
Avatar do usuário Sra_Tradutora 3300 6 74
There is a slight difference between "may" and "might" when talking about the past.

If we say, "He was a talented musician so he MAY have joined a world-renowned orchestra", it means that we don't know what happened to him but it is a possibility that he joined an orchestra. "He was a talented musician so he MIGHT have joined a world-renowned orchestra" means that we was good enough to join the orchestra if he wanted to.

"A lifejacket MAY have allowed John to survive" means that John survived because he was wearing a lifejacket. "A lifejacket MIGHT have allowed John to survive" means that John is dead because he wasn't wearing one.
Avatar do usuário Henry Cunha 10000 3 16 177
Os usos de 'may' e 'might' são bem complexos, e o grau de uso depende muito da expressão em que estão sendo usados. Em certos casos, ocorre a substituição no decorrer do tempo, como aqui: (to think)

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?co ... =10&share=

Em outros casos, persiste a distinção: (to wonder/to feel)

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?co ... =10&share=

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?co ... =10&share=

E em outros casos, provavelmente ocorrem outras substituições relacionadas com sentidos próximos vindo de outras expressões, como neste caso:

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?co ... =10&share=

Portanto, a meu ver, existe um amplo leque de variações, mas me parece bem difícil defender que (1) 'may' está desaparecendo, ou que (2) podemos sempre substituir 'may' por 'might'. Demora tempo para adquirir o que me parece serem praticamente colocações, ou usos estáveis, mas isso acontece com o tempo. Basta ter paciência.
Avatar do usuário Judy Friedkin 710 2 20
I am only telling you the reality of the usage in the US. They are used interchangeably and may is always correct for asking permission. For a second language learner this whole topic is really knit-picking because there are "bigger fish to fry" than all of this discussion about may and might.
Avatar do usuário Henry Cunha 10000 3 16 177
E esta talvez seja um dos melhores exemplos de uma expressão onde existe uma distinta preferência por 'may':

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?co ... =10&share=
Avatar do usuário Henry Cunha 10000 3 16 177
So the question is, Do Americans use 'may' as well as 'might', and with what frequency?

Some hard data. The University of Michigan has a huge corpus of American spoken English, which I searched for the occurrence of these two words. As follows:

For 'may': 991 hits
At: http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/c/corpus/ ... =1;size=25

For 'might': 1475 hits
At: http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/c/corpus/ ... =1;size=25

So on a broad comparative scale, for every 5 uses of 'might', there are 3.3 uses of 'may'. So 'may' is used, and extensively.

Some aspects of the analysis are informative (at the very end of each report, if you want to check further). On 'Highly Interactive' occurrences, for every 5 'mights' there are about 2.5 uses of 'may.' If we look only at the use by only "Undergraduates" -- presumably the least academically trained in this sample of spoken English -- there occur 93 uses of 'may' and 239 uses of 'might.' No significant change in the comparative picture.

I would suspect the same would hold for, say, high school seniors eligible for college entrance. Or for 40-year-olds with 15 years of work experience.

So I don't think it holds water to say that Americans don't use 'may'. They probably use it some 2-3 times for every 5 times that they use 'might'.
She might be has cooking for hours.

Posso usar essa frase com o sentindo del está cozinhando por horas ?
Present perfect ,estaria correto a frase.
Porém não tendo certeza da afirmação
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Vinicius Gomes escreveu:She might be has cooking for hours.

Posso usar essa frase com o sentindo del está cozinhando por horas ?
Present perfect ,estaria correto a frase.
Porém não tendo certeza da afirmação


A maneira correta seria usar
She must have been cooking for hours

Mas se eu tivesse descrevendo uma foto e nao tivesse certeza dela está cozinhando por horas
Poderia usar o might be ?fiquei confuso