Do you prefer to learn American or British English? Why?

Ravenna 3
w.slayman escreveu:
Ravenna escreveu: Ravenna,

Over the years I have had the opportunity to talk to many British subjects, and it has been my experience that, with the exception of a few words with different meanings, the difference in accents is not a major problem in communication. In my opinion the most important factors for effective communication are: using proper grammar, construction, and pronunciation, therefore a slight accent is not normally a factor. Since you are a native of Brazil you will probably have a predominantly Braizilian accent for quite some time. With that being said, I would like to offer a rewrite of your post for your consideration, it is in American English. ;)

I hope this helps you, please let me know.
Hi Bill, you corrections always help me! :D

About the 'accent' I meant that when I'm speaking English (actually trying to speak English) my 'English voice' sounds more American than British lol A teacher once said it was because the way I pronounce the letter "R".
Some Brazilians especially those ones from Brazilian states of Minas Gerais, São Paulo, Paraná, etc, pronounce the letter "R" kind of similar to the way Americans do. Ask you wife and she will tell you :D

All the best my friend!

See you!

Giulia (aka Ravenna)
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Ravenna,

Thank you for your kind words about my corrections.

I understand what you are saying about the letter "R", it is one of the few letters in Portuguese that I do not have trouble with.

Happy New Year
Feliz Ano Novo
Ravenna 3
w.slayman escreveu:Ravenna,

Thank you for your kind words about my corrections.

I understand what you are saying about the letter "R", it is one of the few letters in Portuguese that I do not have trouble with.

Happy New Year
Feliz Ano Novo
You're welcome Bill! ;) And Happy New Year to you too!

And good luck with your Portuguese studies in 2011!
Jedson 2 2
I study the two yet. I still didn't identify myself with one or the other.
Jedson escreveu:I study the two yet. I still didn't identify myself with one or the other.

Jedson,

Please consider this rewrite and let me know what you think.

"At the present time I have not decided which version of English I prefer, therefore I am content with a general study of English."
I prefer American English, because it is more understandable to me. Sometimes I cannot understand simple sentences spoken by britishes. There is another reason, the majority of the literatures in English I have been reading is from USA.
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ENG_rafael escreveu:I prefer American English, because it is more understandable to me. Sometimes I cannot understand simple sentences spoken by britishes. There is another reason, the majority of the literatures in English I have been reading is from USA.
Rafael,

I would like to suggest three changes: the first - change "britishes" to "Englishmen"; second - change "literatures in English" to "English literature"; third - change "from USA" to "Americian". Thus giving a post that would read.

"I prefer American English, because it is more understandable to me. Sometimes I can not understand simple sentences spoken by Englishmen. There is another reason, the majority of the English literature I have been reading is American."

I hope the above makes sense to you, please let me know.
Bill,

I understand your changes and I enjoy them!
I wrote literatures in English due to in Portuguese we say this using the structure which is in my version, but English is not Portuguese. I will pay attention for this case.

Other question, may I say Britishers (it looks like Britishes) instead of Englishmen?

Thanks a lot
I like american english better, because for me it is prettier than british english. :)
And I hope in 2012 make an exchange for Canada.
I prefer what some would call Global English (instead of American or British one).
This is a wonderful topic and we could be here discussing for the rest of our lives and we will end up without any practical conclusion. :!:
The question in itself narrows the language as if there were only two counties in the world where English is spoken. I am sure that the author knows it. English is spoken all around the world and, guess what? Even in Brazil the language can be spoken. :D
Then I answer the question with another question: how a language can be regarded as American or British if it can be spoken everywhere, I dare to say?
I prefer to learn British English because I got to understand better than American English.
I love British accent!

:D
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Can I say both? :D

I work with tourists that come from all over the world, from many countries. So, AmE is better to me to understand them and for them to understand me. But, the British accent is SO MUCH BEAUTIFUL. I wish I could speak like a British (from north) or a Scottish.
ENG_rafael escreveu:Bill,

I understand your changes and I enjoy them!
I wrote literatures in English due to in Portuguese we say this using the structure which is in my version, but English is not Portuguese. I will pay attention for this case.

Other question, may I say Britishers (it looks like Britishes) instead of Englishmen?

Thanks a lot
Rafael,

I understand why you made the structure mistake, I do the same when trying to speak or write in Portuguese. :lol:

While technicaly correct, Britisher(s) is archaic. As a personal preference I use "Englishman" or "Englishmen". Of course we Americans sometimes refer to them as "Brit" or "Limey" or "Red Coat" or "Tommy" none of which are very polite, but to be absolutely correct one can always use "British Subjects".

The British sometimes call Americans "Yankee", or "Yank" (short for Yankee), or "Colonial", and of course the Latin Americans sometimes refer to North Americans as "Gringo", again not especially polite.

I hope I have not totaly confused you with my attempt explain with a little humor. ;)

To my fellow citizens and all Brisish Subjects no offense was or is intended. :D
Bill,
You are so funny and I understand your message crystal clearly. Now I know how to deal with the two sides!!! :lol:
Keep up the good work!
Thanks
I prefer to learn British English because of the way words are pronounced, which in my opinion is perfect.
In the USA most people change the "t" by "r"and say the words together, which makes learning easier but makes pronunciation poor.
I also don't like the way some Americans "sing" the words ending all sentences with the word "man". I don't know if it's typical from somewhere in special there, but I really don't like that accent.
patriciasrv escreveu:I prefer to learn British English because of the way words are pronounced, which in my opinion is perfect.
In the USA most people change the "t" by "r"and say the words together, which makes learning easier but makes pronunciation poor.
I also don't like the way some Americans "sing" the words ending all sentences with the word "man". I don't know if it's typical from somewhere in special there, but I really don't like that accent.
Patricia,

I would like to suggest three minor changes as follows: In the USA ... the "t" to "r", second ... "but makes for poor pronunciation. " and the final suggestion ... "it's typical or from a certain locality, but ..."

I can not recall ever hearing the "t" changed to "r" so I can not comment on that, but the tendency to end every sentence with "man", "drives me up the wall", this habit is often typical of younger and less educated people.

Idiom - Drives me up the wall
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Ravenna 3
w.slayman escreveu: I can not recall ever hearing the "t" changed to "r" so I can not comment on that (...)
Bill,

Patrícia was talking about the flapping rule. I learned that 'flapping rule' is that middle consonant sound of 'butter' and 'better' in American English. ;)

For us Brazilians, it seems that Americans say "better" with a "r" instead of "tt".

Does that make sense to you?

Ravenna.
Ravena,

I attended Catholic Schools for several years, and the sisters very firmly, sometimes with a wooden ruler across our knuckles, insisted that we use proper pronunciation. Some of their pet peeves were the difference between "pen" and "pin", not using any slang, absolutely no use of "ain't", and never dropping the "g" from a word ending in "ing".

I can now understand what you and Patricia are saying, but believe me, I would never even think of using the "flapping rule", because I would be afraid that Mother Superior would hear me and "arise from the dead" to rap my knuckles with her ruler. ;) :D

Some of my southern friends make fun of me because I say "fishing" as opposed to "fishin", etc.

Thanks for the English Lesson, I learned something new today, which proves that "Even an old dog can learn new tricks".
Ravenna 3
w.slayman escreveu: I attended Catholic Schools for several years, and the sisters very firmly, sometimes with a wooden ruler across our knuckles, insisted that we use proper pronunciation. Some of their pet peeves were the difference between "pen" and "pin", not using any slang, absolutely no use of "ain't", and never dropping the "g" from a word ending in "ing".
Catholic Schools?

Well, when I was 5, my father wanted to send me to a Catholic School, but my mother didn't like the idea, she said she couldn't trust a stranger to take care of me, for her, even a nun was a stranger. :lol: She told me one of the sisters said that 'gentle discipline doesn't hurt' maybe she thought 'gentle discipline' was using a wooden ruler across my knuckles.
w.slayman escreveu: I can now understand what you and Patricia are saying, but believe me, I would never even think of using the "flapping rule", because I would be afraid that Mother Superior would hear me and "arise from the dead" to rap my knuckles with her ruler. ;) :D
Unless you say 'flappin' rule' she won't come back to haunt you :lol:
w.slayman escreveu: Thanks for the English Lesson, I learned something new today, which proves that "Even an old dog can learn new tricks".


You're welcome, Bill. And I'm glad to know you learned something new! But hey, you're still young to say that :D

All the best my friend,

C-ya!
Bill,

Thank you for your comment and suggestions, I really appreciate them!
Ravenna escreveu:
w.slayman escreveu: I can not recall ever hearing the "t" changed to "r" so I can not comment on that (...)
Bill,

Patrícia was talking about the flapping rule. I learned that 'flapping rule' is that middle consonant sound of 'butter' and 'better' in American English. ;)

For us Brazilians, it seems that Americans say "better" with a "r" instead of "tt".

Does that make sense to you?

Ravenna.
Ravenna,
This is exactly what I'm talking about! A good example can be the Tongue Twister "Betty Botter", when say from an American sounds like Béry Bórer" but when say by the Brits sounds like "Béty Bótá".
well, i prefer American English because is most used i guess, and there aren't really big diferences between then... so is it :b
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Voelho escreveu:well, i prefer American English because is most used i guess, and there aren't really big diferences between then... so is it :b
Voelho,

Please compare this rewrite to your original and let me know what you think about my suggested improvements, and if you have any questions I will try to answer them.

I prefer American English because it is used more than British English, but I don't think there are any really big differences between them, or is there?
I prefer the British English.
For one thing, it seems more traditional. The accent is more charming. I guess so.
For another, my favorite bands are from the UK. :D

Every single time I know a new word I try to learn both pronunciatons. I know that both are important.
I have some internet friends from the US and from he UK, so when I have the chance to hear their voices, I try to absorb as much as I can about pronunciation and expressions.
I prefer the American english, because
the pronunciation is more clean
British. Why? Mmm, because of the accents themselves, I suppose.

I'm a sort of black sheep in terms of taste. Most south americans do prefer the American English, and I reckon it's because of the American influence we have here. As best as I can tell, in various countries in Europe they do like the British English better, like Sweden, Denmark, Germany, and the like. That makes sense, in my point of view, as it would be rather nonsensical for them to learn the American English [when they have Britain beside them all], and also, it's blantant that the British would be offended.

Or not... well, whatever.
I prefer American English, but I want to improve my British listenning
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I don't know why but I just prefer American English, not because I dislike British English or something like that, no way.
It's just that American English sounds better to my ears and i find it a little difficult to understand British English. British accent is so different from the American one that out of ten words I can't understand around four words.
I prefer British English. Although I've been studying American English I think British's accent is more elegant. It's just a matter of sound.
lsathler escreveu:I prefer British English. Although I've been studying American English I think British's accent is more elegant. It's just a matter of sound.
Isathler,

I would like to suggest that you use the phrase "the British accent" instead of "British's accent", because the language can not be possesive.
I prefer to learn american english cuz I hope to visit New York one day.
I guess american english most beautiful than british cause, the british english seems a little more "strong".
When americans are speaking, oh my God, it seems music to my ears,
I love to watch american series, movies or talk shows... hehe :)

see ya guys!
xoxo
:*
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