He, She ou It em sujeito de sexo indeterminado?

Avatar do usuário João Souza 55 1
O difícil num é usar no lugar de "He", "She" e "It", é no lugar de: "Him", "Her", "His" e "Its".
Avatar do usuário Gabi 705 1 1 13
Ok,
the first go is one possible sentence, but I doubt that the second one is right. If it is , how come? I don't understand the second one, seriously.

However, isn't way easier if we just simply say:
"How do you stop loving someone when they've stopped loving you?"
Avatar do usuário Gabi 705 1 1 13
I got this extract from an online dictionary ;

4- used when talking about someone who may be male or female, to avoid saying 'he or she': If anyone has any information related to the crime, will they please contact the police.
Every child, whoever they are, deserves to have a mum and a dad.
http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/they

It's not old-fashioned, I think that's still quite used nowadays.
Avatar do usuário Flavia.lm 3885 1 9 86
Indeterminate gender
In languages with a masculine and feminine gender (and possibly a neuter), the masculine is usually employed by default to refer to persons of unknown gender. This is still done sometimes in English, although a disputed alternative is to use the singular "they". Another alternative is to use two nouns, as in the phrase "ladies and gentlemen" (hendiadys).

In the plural, the masculine is often used to refer to a mixed group of people. Thus, in French the feminine pronoun elles always designates an all-female group of people, but the masculine pronoun ils may refer to a group of males, to a mixed group, or to a group of people of unknown genders. In English, this issue does not arise with pronouns, since there is only one plural third person pronoun, "they". However, a group of actors and actresses would still be described as a group of "actors". However, this is also because the word "actress" is falling out of use in English, while the word "actor," like "doctor," applies to thespians of both sexes.

In all these cases, one says that the feminine gender is semantically marked, while the masculine gender is unmarked.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammatical_gender

Leiam tb:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singular_they
http://everything2.com/title/Using+%252 ... e+singular
Avatar do usuário Henry Cunha 9960 2 17 177
It's just shoddy English:

If anyone has any information related to the crime, will they please contact the police.
Better: If anyone has any information related to the crime, please contact the police.

Every child, whoever they are, deserves to have a mum and a dad.
Better: All children, whoever they are, deserve to have their own mums and dads.
Every child without exception deserves to have a mum and dad.
Regardless of who they are, all children deserve...

There are various ways of avoiding this ugly lack of agreement. The dictionary is stating a fact, that people do talk that way, and they do, but it's not primarily to avoid sexist language. It's because it's a way of generalizing, of stating general truths. I have no problem with that, and don't go correcting people around the kitchen table when they do it (see, I just switched to "they" twice above). But when you're writing, I would certainly avoid it. It just takes a bit of editing. And if done consistently, pretty soon one learns to avoid the problem altogether in speaking or writing.
Regards
Avatar do usuário Gabi 705 1 1 13
Ok, I understand your point guys.
And I don't think you're wrong Henry. But I'm sorry, I don't stick to your ideia.
Although all the examples you've given to me, I've got mine ones, I've read it on books and on the internet... it's commom, not just spoken language but written , as well.
Plus, not just my teacher but other people I know have explained exactely the same thing to me. I tried different sources, though.
I intend now to think that it might be the Canadian English different in some aspects. I've been studying English in the U.K. and perhaps it`s just a matter of where we are.
Like the "I've got" and "I got".... In USA people usually say "I got" and in the U.K. "I've got". I don't know...

But once I read on the bbc website, I'd tried to find and post here, but it was a quite long time ago and I'm struggling to figure where it's.
Avatar do usuário Gabi 705 1 1 13
I'd said "although , all the examples.."
I supposed to say "despite... "ahahha
Avatar do usuário Flavia.lm 3885 1 9 86
Pessoal,

Um bom vídeo sobre o assunto

http://mw1.merriam-webster.com/video/0033-hisher.htm
Avatar do usuário Flavia.lm 3885 1 9 86
Acabei de ler e lembrei deste tópico aqui:

"Stephen Covey's theories on learning from the habits of successful people in his book The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People suggest that by emulating the habits of successful people, anyone can enjoy the life he or she desires." (Washington Post).
Avatar do usuário Marcio_Farias 12350 1 22 206
Flavia escreveu:[...] by emulating the habits of successful people, anyone can enjoy the life he or she desires." (Washington Post).

De outra forma o jornal poderia, na minha opinião, ter escrito:

"[...] habits of successful people, other people can enjoy the life they desire."

... embora a palavra people aparecesse repetida.