Qual a diferença entre I'm e I am ?

Olá a todos.

Qual a diferença entre I'm e I am ? E quando devo usar ?

Thank you

Anúncio Converse grátis por 15 minutos com um professor e verifique como está o seu nível de inglês. Perder o medo de se comunicar é o primeiro passo para a fluência. Cadastre-se na Cambly e experimente o método sem compromisso.

Iniciar Conversação
11 respostas
Nenhuma.

I am é a forma normal e I'm é a forma abrevida/contraida.

Você pode usar qualquer uma delas.
Olá! Não há diferença. I'm é a contração de I am, assim como You're - You are;
We're - We are;
He's - He is;
She's - She is;
They're - They are... etc

É como no português... O que você/cê está/tá fazendo?

As contrações servem unicamente para tornar o idioma mais simples e natural.

God bless!
Sim, não há diferença de significado, porém, se você estiver escrevendo uma carta, um email ou até mesmo um texto que sejam formais, não use as formas contraídas.
Quando eu quiser escrever EU SOU O SMITH, esta certo escrever I'm to Smith ?
Henry Cunha 3 17 182
Camila_EE escreveu:Nenhuma.

I am é a forma normal e I'm é a forma abrevida/contraida.

Você pode usar qualquer uma delas.
Depende, não é? Em certos casos, não abreviamos, nem no falado nem no escrito:

A: Are you sure?
B: Yes, I am.

A: That's not the way he is, really.
B: I know. He's usually very friendly.

A forma oral determina quando podemos contrair e quando não devemos.
Teste de Nível Faça um teste de inglês e descubra seu nível em 10 minutos! Este teste foi desenvolvido por professores experientes. O resultado sai na hora e com gabarito.

Iniciar o Teste Online!
Henry Cunha 3 17 182
Rakell Grubert Pere escreveu:Sim, não há diferença de significado, porém, se você estiver escrevendo uma carta, um email ou até mesmo um texto que sejam formais, não use as formas contraídas.
Rakell, I would say that's too restrictive. There's lots of formal writing with contracted forms. It's a stylistic issue. The greater difficulty is, first, to establish a consistent style. The second, for non-natives, is to learn to proceed from the spoken form to the written form.
Englishman,
Não se usa a preposição "to" nesse caso. Diga simplesmente: I'm Smith.
Ok, Henry, maybe I'm being too resctrictive when I say that they can't be used in formal writing, but I think you would have agreed if I had said that they should be avoided, specially in official exams such as FCE, CAE, TOEFL etc., wouldn't you?
Henry Cunha 3 17 182
Hi, Rakell, I've never taken any of these tests, nor am I familiar with their directives about the "proper" use of contractions, so I don't know the answer to your question. But I took a quick look at TOEFL's own use of them in this TOEFL Planner document, and ran across the following:

"You’ve been studying English for some time now, so you’ve developed a level of proficiency in your reading, listening, speaking and writing skills. Now you’ll want to make sure you’re familiar with the test format and that you’re ready to do your best. This Planner gives you test information, sample questions and activities to build your skills, and much more." (p. 6) From http://www.ets.org/s/toefl/pdf/toefl_st ... lanner.pdf

Wow. Does TOEFL really advise against the use of contractions in formal writing?
Henry, you may not agree but when students are being prepared for any of these official examinations( FCE,CAE, CPE, TOEFL ...) teachers usually say : Don't use contractions in formal writing!
There must be a reason for that advice...

See this vídeo from engVid.com
Emma says right at the beginning : "Do not use contractions."
http://www.engvid.com/5-tips-to-improve-your-writing/

And this:
Avoid contractions
Contractions are appropriate only for conversational use and for informal writing, never for technical or formal writing.
http://homepages.inf.ed.ac.uk/jbednar/writingtips.html
Teste de Nível Faça um teste de inglês e descubra seu nível em 10 minutos! Este teste foi desenvolvido por professores experientes. O resultado sai na hora e com gabarito.

Iniciar o Teste Online!
Henry Cunha 3 17 182
Rakell, I agree with you that such advice not to use contractions is probably a wise one. But my reason would be that non-natives are likely to misuse contractions, not knowing when and where to use them. Here's an illustration from a research paper from http://www.brookings.edu/research/paper ... mBrookings:

"It is clear that different segments of the high school population need different postsecondary opportunities. Some are academically able and should be applying to selective schools. Others are much less well prepared and might benefit more from a one-year certificate in a high-demand field such as health, computers, or welding. One size doesn’t fit all."

She opens with "It is clear", and doesn't contract it. She ends with "one size doesn't fit all", a contraction. It's a stylistic device. It works when you do it that way, in a concluding sentence that highlights the point being made.

I know I can find many other examples that contradict this so-called rule. At the same time I can see why it might be taught to learners of English as a commandment.
Ainda precisa de ajuda? Confira algumas opções:
  1. Clique no botão "Responder" (abaixo) e faça sua pergunta sobre este assunto;
  2. Faça uma nova pergunta;
  3. Converse grátis com um professor nativo por 15 minutos: Saiba como!