Qual a diferença entre o uso do GO e Come

itabira
A duvida eh:

Podemos utilizar:
GO IN / COME IN - para dizer entrar
GO OUT / COME OUT - para dizer sair
GO BACK / COME BACK - para dizer voltar

nestes casos qual a diferenca entre o uso do go e come?
quando quero utilizar entrar e sair numa mesma frase devo faze-la usando o mesmo verbo ex: go ou posso utilizar ambos?

exemplo: If you go in here, you can't go back ! or
if you go in here, you can't come back !

all the best folks !
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2 respostas
Ordenar por: Votos

maryziller 325 1 1
As luck would have it, there is a bilingual page about the verbs go and come:
http://www.languageguide.org/english/gr ... rt1/go.jsp

It also has a sound recording of the example sentences.

maryziller 325 1 1
itabira escreveu:A duvida eh:

Podemos utilizar:
GO IN / COME IN - para dizer entrar
GO OUT / COME OUT - para dizer sair
GO BACK / COME BACK - para dizer voltar

nestes casos qual a diferenca entre o uso do go e come?
quando quero utilizar entrar e sair numa mesma frase devo faze-la usando o mesmo verbo ex: go ou posso utilizar ambos?

exemplo: If you go in here, you can't go back ! or
if you go in here, you can't come back !
You are right; this can be confusing!
Have you ever noticed in TV that when people say "Vai!" in Portuguese, Americans would say "Come on!"

Your example sounds ok to me but...

I would say, If you go in there, you can't come back out again.
"If you go in here you can't go back out again" is also ok.
"If you go in there, you can't come back out." is how I would say it.

GO IN / COME IN - para dizer entrar
"Go in" or "Go on in" would be said by a person encouraging you to enter a room when you are on the outside.
"Come in" or "Come on in" would be said by the person inviting you to enter his office or join him in his room or home.
Adding the word "on" makes it sound more friendly like an invitation you can accept or reject, and less like a command which you have to follow.

GO OUT / COME OUT - para dizer sair
"Go out" can mean to exit a place or leave it.
"Come out" can mean arrive at.
Example: If you go out the side door of the theater, you will come out in the alley that leads to the parking lot.

"Go out" as a command is usually expressed with the verb "get out!" (=leave, leave me alone, leave me in peace, get out of my face, get out of my sight, get away from me. It expresses anger or frustration or negative emotion).

But if you are giving directions and not telling a person to leave, say "Go out that way" (=exit by that door/hallway/path).
"Come out" would be said by a person trying to find someone who is hiding, as in the game "hide and seek" or by someone telling another person to leave an office or area where they are not allowed to be (or to join them outside or in another area, ).

Examples:
Mother is tired of trying to find her son, John, so she says, "Come out, come out, wherever you are!"
John is in Daddy's office and he is not supposed to bother Daddy's important papers. Mom yells "Johnathan Williams! Come out, NOW!!!" or "Come out from there, NOW!!!"
John just woke up from his nap. "Johnny come on out and join us. We are watching the Simpsons."

GO BACK / COME BACK - para dizer voltar
Go back can mean return, i.e retracing your steps, taking the same path to return to your starting point
Or can be a command such as "go back to START" in games or "Go back where you came from," when giving directions.
Come back as a command or request means return to me or to where the speaker is.
Go back as a command means go away from the speaker to where you were.