Em qual sala você vai estudar... - Tradução em inglês

Olá novamente, preciso de ajuda na tradução da seguinte frase:

- Em qual sala você vai estudar, na minha ou na do Fulano?

Seria:

- In which classroom will you study, in mine or in Fulano's?

Estou tendo muita em montar frases com essa estrutura: com opções e com o possessivo abreviado. Por favor, tentem manter a estrutura da tradução o mais próximo possivel da frase em portugues. Muito obrigado.

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In which classroom will you study, in mine or in Fulano's?
In which classroom are you going to study, mine or Drake's?

Although the examples above are grammatically correct, I can't imagine using either sentence in an informal conversation. The second sentence sounds more natural, as we generally say "are you going to" as opposed to "will you" in this type pf context.

A much more common way of expressing the same idea would be something like:

Are you going to study in my classroom or (in) Fulano's?
ATIVE O ENGLISH PLUS POR R$ 8/MÊS Além de aprender sem anúncios, você terá acesso: aos Cursos do English Experts, a respostas verificadas por especialistas (ilimitado) e ao aplicativo Meu Vocabulário. ATIVAR AGORA
9 62 593
- Which classroom will you study, mine or Drake's?
- Which classroom you are going to study, mine or Drake's?
Muito obrigado Telma, mas uma dúvida no segundo exemplo: por que não é "are you going"?
9 62 593
Drake, eu estou muito acostumada, no meu dia-a-dia, com o inglês informal. Na sentença: "Which classroom you are going to study, mine or Drake's?" eu escrevi de uma maneira informal. Quando estamos muito acostumados com a linguagem informal, às vezes cometemos erros gramaticais. Please, forgive me.
"Which" é usado, como nesse exemplo, para oferecer escolhas e existem muitas perguntas que são formuladas dessa forma e que são muito comuns na linguagem informal, mas gramaticalmente incorretas.
Exemplos:
Which way you're going? (informal)
Which country you're going to visit? (informal)

Em indirect questions, a sentença está correta dessa forma:
"Do you know, which class you're going to study, mine or Drake's?"
6 48 1.1k
You do have a point, Telma.
I "struggled" a lot against the flow when a took an English course once, the teacher wanted a conversation "by the book". So she gave me a hard time when I said something a la "gonna/gotta'' or any slangy or substandard word while in class.
Problem is, we had a year to cram up everything and the course was half- conversational and half-grammar, so a hard nut to crack in just a year. That´s why it´s understandable.
And that´s why I come to the conclusion that a year (sometimes you even find six-month courses) don´t leave you a sharp guy on English stuff.
You either learn by the book language with no frills, or you learn the conversational way, with the full flowery of the English language.
I mean, with the informal, the slangy and even local ways and accents involved.
In fact, English courses might be seen as the bottom rung of language education, people would have to go other places to complement his studies.
And people coming to Brazil might have the same problems, those of learning by the books and then seeing a whole different can of worms at the streets, firstly because of language is by definition dynamic, and then, comes the regionalisms peculiar to each of the regions of the country!
Nothing that a somewhat traveled teacher; or at least, a fairly well-educated one, can´t fill the gap.
9 62 593
Paulo, the opposite happened to me. I learned English, by the books, in Brazil, and, after working and living amongst British people, I had to "lighten up" my speech a lot. I quite often heard: "Telma, you speak English like we learn in school!". And then, they can tell straight away that you're a foreigner...

Cheers
Thank you all. It's good to know how to speak in a less formal way :mrgreen:

brasimericano: I think that phrase, in portuguese, isn't that uncommon. I frequently listen somethings like:

Person 1: "Eae, vai quando renovar a sua identidade, amanha ou segunda?"
Person 2: "Pô cara, resolvi deixar pra quarta-feira."

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Person 1: "Ae pessoal, a gente vai fazer o trabalho na casa de quem, na minha mesmo ou na do João?"
Person 2: "Ah, bora na sua mesmo. É mais perto."

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The answers and tips was very useful. Thanks again.
6 48 1.1k
These kind of talking ''e aê"/"bora" isn´t uncommom among "cariocas", altough "bora" isn´t peculiar to the state, it is used all over Brazil. And I can say that by experience, I traveled virtually all across the whole country.
If that was a try to be ironic, it´s cool, I see the point. :D
It doesn´t mean that all "cariocas" use the lingo, tough. Let´s not generalize.
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I am glad that the answers and tips were useful. :D