Uso coloquial de anti-social em Inglês

As I was writing, I started to wonder if in English the term "antisocial" and "antisocial behavior" is really used in the colloquial sense for English speakers in the same way as it happens in Portuguese when people say: Aquela pessoa não tem amigos, pois é anti-social. The reason for me to wonder it's because it is translated as a possible meaning for antisocial (in English), however, researching the term correctly in its scientific meaning and criminal one antisocial is behavior related to acting against social norms (like stealing, or lying to gain advantages) and not being an introvert, unsociable, nor misanthropic.
So, is it used in this colloquial sense for English speakers, or is google confusing the two?

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5 respostas
PPAULO 6 48 1.2k
Usually we would say in English that somebody is not a people's people, or that he is not popular, that he doesn't like to hang out with friends, don't socialize much, don't interact much, etc.

But yes, "antisocial" can be used also in the sense unclubbable, unsocial, detached, reclusive, distant, aloof, asocial, unneighbourly, unfriendly, icy, dry, unapproachable, nongregarious, ungregarious. Not necessarily in a rude or unfriendly (inimical) way.
In the same way we find it used in Portuguese, and that gave origin to your question.
Leonardo96 18 289
It can be used that way too, but it's probably more common to hear "he's not very social/not a very social person". To my thinking the term "antisocial" does have a bit of a formal ring to it in English, more so than when one says it in Portuguese, so people just say that someone is not social instead. More commonly and often, that is. It's also common to hear the terms "withdrawn" or that someone mostly "just keeps it to himself", is not a "social butterfly", or is not "the life of the party" type of person. These however may have more to do with introversion in the sense that one prefers to spend time by themselves rather than not wanting to be around people because they actively don't like it/hate it. Both behaviors and personality traits can correlate and be interchangeable at times, though.
Leonardo96 18 289
PPAULO escreveu: 25 Jan 2022, 22:59 Usually we would say in English that somebody is not a people's people, or that he is not popular, that he doesn't like to hang out with friends, don't socialize much, don't interact much, etc.

But yes, "antisocial" can be used also in the sense unclubbable, unsocial, detached, reclusive, distant, aloof, asocial, unneighbourly, unfriendly, icy, dry, unapproachable, nongregarious, ungregarious. Not necessarily in a rude or unfriendly (inimical) way.
In the same way we find it used in Portuguese, and that gave origin to your question.
Hi Paulo, I think you meant "people person". No apostrophe and the latter part is "person" rather than "people" being repeated. Same as when someone says "I'm a dog person" when referring to the fact that they either like dogs or prefer dogs over other pets. Make sense?
PPAULO 6 48 1.2k
You're right, buddy. It was Jormugand wedging 'colloquial' in the question and the Andwella album on Spotify that screwed up my head. LOL. :-)
Thanks for pointing that out. High five! ;-)
Leonardo96 escreveu: 25 Jan 2022, 23:18 It can be used that way too, but it's probably more common to hear "he's not very social/not a very social person". To my thinking the term "antisocial" does have a bit of a formal ring to it in English, more so than when one says it in Portuguese, so people just say that someone is not social instead. More commonly and often, that is. It's also common to hear the terms "withdrawn" or that someone mostly "just keeps it to himself", is not a "social butterfly", or is not "the life of the party" type of person. These however may have more to do with introversion in the sense that one prefers to spend time by themselves rather than not wanting to be around people because they actively don't like it/hate it. Both behaviors and personality traits can correlate and be interchangeable at times, though.
Before anything, thanks all for the replies!
I got that same impression from the English uses I've heard, but since that depends pretty much on me hearing from shows and series it's rather hard to distinguish, since dialogue in media is used differently (especially in movies). It seems as well that adding the word "beavior" (or behaviour) to it makes the expression even more inclined to the scientific/criminology sense.
Thank you very much for the contribution.