Como dizer "leiteira" em inglês

anamontardo 25
What's the word to refer to that kind of aluminium cup used to warm milk up?

Thanx!
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27 respostas
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Flavia.lm 4085 1 10 93
Olá Ana,

Encontrei a opção "milk pan"
Daniel.S 705 1 2 7
Hi there!

Minha sugestão: milk jug

Take care,
Donay Mendonça 62960 22 99 1525
Complementando:

Milk pitcher

Bons estudos!
Thomas 14790 7 60 287
I don't know if we have the "leiteira" in the USA. Perhaps this is something common in the UK, Australia, etc. Or perhaps USA mothers use it for heating milk for children. For heating milk for chocolate, I think the average household uses a simple pan, any pan.

In the USA, "milk jug" is the name commonly applied to large plastic containers in which milk is sold. The typical jug holds a gallon or 3.8 liters. In other words, it is impossible to use the jug for heating milk.

And a "milk pitcher" is simple an attractive alternative to the jug for keeping milk on a table. Could it have another meaning? Sure. Going to Merriam-Webster online, the definition of pitcher there is no mention of it being used to heat liquids.

Quite possibly, these are yet two more examples of the differences between British English and American English.
Daniel.S 705 1 2 7
Donay:

yours looks nicer than mine...LOL

Milk pitcher...never heard that one before..

Daniel
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Daniel.S 705 1 2 7
That's right Thomas. I remember using milk jug for those plastic milk containers when working at a restaurant, but surprisingly as I google it I found the picture I've posted above.

Daniel
Gabi 830 1 1 15
But...yeah. pitcher is "bule". I agree with Thomas, a pitcher is
not exactly something to warm milk.

Here's a recipe of how to make warm milk hahahha :

Step 1: Pore a little bit of sugar (if using diet sugar you can put about a half of a pack in) and a little bit of Vanilla. And of course MILK! (any kind will work).

Step 2: Put in microwave for a minute to a minute and a half or put milk in a pot on the stove for as long as you would like it to be.

Step 3: Enjoy!


http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_do_you_make_warm_milk
Thomas 14790 7 60 287
I had a chat with Americans this afternoon about this subject. I had forgotten that American mothers (well, fathers too) do not heat milk for children in a pan. They put the milk into a bottle, and the heat the contents in a "banho-maria". (No, I don't know the word in English. Double-boiler?) Milk is rarely heated for anything other than to give to babies. When milk is heated for chocolate, cocoa, etc., it is usually heated in a microwave, and that requires a non-metal container.

No agreement was reached about what was or was not a milk jug or milk pitcher. To me, a milk jug is the plastic container in which milk is sold. For others, the container was a milk carton despite the fact that "carton" implies paper and the containers are made of plastic. Some had not heard of "milk pitcher". I associate the word with a large container to serve milk to many people (military, summer camp, etc.).
anamontardo 25
I'm really glad my simple question raised so much discussion! And I'm surprised American people don't heat (is warm up right?) milk or do it in the microwave only!!! For me, heating milk is a daily routine!!!

Thank you very much!
Flavia.lm 4085 1 10 93
Thomas,

Firstly, here is the post about how to say banho-maria in English.
"Milk is rarely heated for anything other than to give to babies."
My question is: WHY? As you know I was in US last week and it was hard to survive for so much time without "real" coffee, and when I asked to have some milk to "soften" (amenizar) the taste of it, the milk was served cold (!) urghhhh

This is a common leiteira used here in Brazil - I have MANY and use them to heat milk, water to prepare tea, etc. I noticed its handle is different than the ones in the images of "milk pans" I googled. They are usually made of aluminum.
Imagem
Flavia.lm 4085 1 10 93
Tem zilhões de fotinhos legais de utensílios de cozinha no Merriam Visual, mas não achei a leiteira...

http://visual.merriam-webster.com/food- ... itchen.php
Thomas 14790 7 60 287
Ana, what do you use the warm milk for?

Flavia, you're right: it's very common to put cold milk into hot coffee, and then people wonder why the coffee gets cold. When we talked about milk today, my son said he only heated milk to add to expresso. Thinking back, I only heating milk (warming coffee up) to make cocoa or to add to coffee. I use a ceramic mug that I put into the microwave.
Flavia.lm 4085 1 10 93
Thomas escreveu:(...)

Flavia, you're right: it's very common to put cold milk into hot coffee, and then people wonder why the coffee gets cold. (...)
No comments. LOL

Thomas escreveu:(...)

Thinking back, I only heating milk (warming coffee up) to make cocoa or to add to coffee. I use a ceramic mug that I put into the microwave.
You see? There're still some sensible Americans who knows coffee+milk tastes way better when it is hot. :)

And, what would you do if you didn't have a microwave?

And, do you have a special name for "coffee+milk"? Here in Brazil we have "pingado", "média", etc etc etc...
Thomas 14790 7 60 287
You see? There're still some sensible Americans who knows coffee+milk tastes way better when it is hot. :)
Flavia, Americans like hot coffee, but for some reason it's most unusual to heat up milk to add to it. You will see this done at gourmet coffee places (Starbucks, for example), but in a restaurant, they will use milk that is either cold or at room-temperature.


And, what would you do if you didn't have a microwave?
We would buy one! lol I even use the micro to heat water for coffee. I use a large plastic measuring couple.

And, do you have a special name for "coffee+milk"? Here in Brazil we have "pingado", "média", etc etc etc...
None that I can think of. "I'd like a coffee with (some) milk." I like lots of milk in my coffee. I say "I want some coffee in my milk." (Not "I want some milk in my coffee.") People understand the joke.


Brazilians and Americans do not see coffee in the same light. My impression is that Brazilians see it as a dessert. Americans see it as a beverage. Except for breakfast, I don't recall being served coffee with my meals in Brazil. In the States, you start off by drinking coffee, drink it throughout the meal, and drink more after the meal.

Here in Costa Rica, people cannot imagine drinking coffee without eating something at the same time. No, I don't mean a meal. I mean a cookie, something sweet, etc. Since Americans see it as a beverage, we will drink it with food, without food, instead of food, in addition to food, on a dare, to wake us up, to wet our whistle before we go to bed, while we are studying, while we are fishing, while... Well, you get the idea.
anamontardo 25
Thomas,

What do I warm up the milk for? For drinking it!!! I drink it with coffee powder (is that right? I mean "café solúvel") or chocolate powder! I like it cold in summer, but in winter I can't drink it cold, cause I live in Rio Grande do Sul, a really cold region of South Brazil. If I drink cold milk at 7 am for my breakfast in winter, I simply freeze!!!

Hugs!
Thomas 14790 7 60 287
So, you drink it with instant coffee and instant cocoa/chocolate.

By coincidence, I lived in Gramado,Canela, and Porto Alegre. The Serra indeed gets cold. In California I lived where there was snow several times during the winter and the temperatures were lower than in RGS, but the cold of the Serra was terrible. I remember wearing a coat in bed.

You should make a post about "chimarrao". I miss it. I rarely drink it now, but in hot weather I drink "térere". "Erva mate" is known to a limited degree in the States where it is called by the Spanish name, "yerba mate". Cuias are mates, bombas are bombillas, "térere" is "cold yerba mate", and a good source for "erva" is the local health food store. In larger cities, you may find it in Latin supermarkets, Argentine restaurants, etc. Yes, I can buy it here in Costa Rica, but only "Taragui". Nasty stuff.

Please continue to make interesting posts. Your questions help all of us.
Flavia.lm 4085 1 10 93
Eis aqui um tópico que serve de exemplo de razão para este fórum existir.

Um dicionário traduziria "leiteira" com uma (ou várias) das opções de tradução apresentadas aqui, e só.
Mas leiam o tópico inteiro pra ver o quanto de informação (tanto linguística quanto cultural) que a gente aprendeu!
anamontardo 25
Thomas,

Did you really live in Gramado? What a coincidence! What the hell did you do there? LOL! Well, cold from Serra Gaúcha is really terrible! Once I cried in Garibaldi because of the cold weather. It turned my bones ice!

"Chimarrão" is great indeed! A friend of mine has a picture in which she is drinking chimarrão in Central Park, NY. LOL!

Hugs!
Thomas 14790 7 60 287
I lived in Vila Suica, on the hill. It is hard to find the entrance, but one is there. What did I do? Sombra e agua fresca. I was retired. I was teaching myself to be Baiano. LOL Gramado is a great place to live, but there is not much to do there. I started an English club with an English teacher there. I did not teach for many reasons. If I had stayed, there were some places where I may have found work. I translated a macumba/candomblé cagtalog into English. Yes,really. And I translated some sociological studies. One paper won a scholarship to study in Greece. Do you think the winner sent me a T-shirt, a postcard, a Greek goddess? Of course not. "Cunhada nao e parente" - Luiz Verrissimo. Other than that, I mostly walked around the Lago Negro, drank a lot of chimarrao, and made plans for my next trip into Porto Alegre for my next "banho de civilizacao". LOL Loved Garibaldi. Loved the Maria Fumaca there. Read all I could find about O Lampeao and Maria Bonita. Quilombos fascinated me. There had been a quilombo (or maybe quilombos) at one end of Gramado, and probably another one between Taquara and Gramado. I also did some work with social workers in Canela, with the prefeitura of Canela, and the Rotary Clubs of Gramado and Canela. And I drank more chimarrao. Oh, and I had a lot of masonic friends in that area.
anamontardo 25
Thomas!

I live in Porto Alegre - although I was born in Ijuí and have already lived in Dom Pedrito and Santa Maria.
It would be nice to talk to you! I think is no good to chat here, once this forum has another purpose. Please, add me on MSN: portellamontardo@hotmail.com ou find me out on Facebook: Ana Maria Montardo.

Hugs!
Carls 3215 2 75
milk pan = (para ferver) = leiteira
milk jug = (para servir) leiteira
milkmaid = (pessoa) leiteira, ordenhadora
Henry Cunha 10210 3 16 182
This was really one of the most informative set of posts on the culinary and cultural differences between Brazilians and North Americans. For a Brazilian, unless you've traveled in the US (and Canada by and large), you will have no idea what an American cup of coffee is like: it's a very watered-down mixture of hot water and coffee, with a very small amount of milk or cream added. Brazilian morning coffee, on the other hand, is mostly hot milk with a small amount of (strong coffee). So the Brazilian morning drink is effectively nutritious hot milk. American coffee isn't intended as part of your daily nutrition. For that, American parents feed their children pure cold milk, or cold milk with cereal, or milk with oats (heated as a "mingau', in this case), etc. So there is no tradition of heating milk in the morning in the vast majority of North-American homes. Consequently there is no particular utensil designed for that purpose: any old pan will do.

As to why cold milk is fine for at least morning and noon meals in North America, keep in mind that we have (by and large) centrally-heated homes in the winter, and (mostly) centrally air-conditioned homes in the summer. You really don't wake up in Toronto either bone-chilled or sweating, regardless of the season. And schools and offices and cars are also climate-controlled, so the outside temperature is generally not an issue. Which may explain at least in part why milk is generally not treated as something you need to heat up.
mrmoura65
Truly speaking I found it as milk pot considering the information in Google images
Marcio Tondin 10
I would say "milk heating jug" or "milk heating pot".
PPAULO 59520 6 45 1063
Hi there, Thomas. Banho-maria would be "water bath" or "bain marie" (this one perhaps more used by people acquainted with cooking).

Sometimes it´s translated here "on the back burner" also to contrast to ( the cooking on) the front burner, and sometimes also means a project that has lower priority at the moment.
Xantipa Colter
Milk Pot, a Milk jug ou pitcher não são as que utilizamos no Brasil.

Source:Google Images/Shopping.
PPAULO 59520 6 45 1063
Ha ha Thomas, you are more Brazilian than many Brazilians, speaks Portuguese, Spanish, English and knows a lot about Brazilian and Latino culture (and not only superficially). You keep wowing us by the hour with such good stories and your experiences around Brazil and abroad! :-)
Curso English Experts Há quanto tempo você estuda inglês? Já passou por sua cabeça que você pode estar estudando de uma forma que dá pouco ou quase nenhum resultado? Que tal fazer um intensivo de inglês de 180 dias e recuperar o tempo perdido?

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