Como dizer "Apagão de mão de obra" em inglês

Ao país resta o apagão de mão de obra, diz leitor sobre problemas da educação. folha.uol.com

OBS.: Apagão de mão de obra é uma condição pior do que escassez de mão de obra.

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3 respostas
PPAULO 6 48 1.1k
Apagão de mão de obra = shortage on the labour market (for the sector concerned...) Linguee.

But on second thought, seeing your example I would say:
Lack of qualified teachers is worse than a simple shortage.


Yeah, a big problem these days. It´s a pity that our society in general doesn´t see that everybody, say an engineer, a soccer player, an actress, a singer. Have to study at tender age, teacher is a much needed profession. Yet, not valued as it deserves.
PPAULO, eu também pensei em "lack", mas eu gostaria de ter encontrado uma palavra que causasse impacto, assim como "apagão."
PPAULO 6 48 1.1k
Maybe you wanted to say that "there is a deficit in the supply side of workforce." it would fit both sentences you offered.


As for the first, ''Ao país resta o apagão de mão de obra, diz leitor sobre problemas da educação."we could say there´s a shortage/lack/deficit/decline of the number of of teachers, due to people regard the career unnatractive."

A more concise way to say that is "the teaching schools aren´t producing adequate numbers of numbers of graduates to meet workforce needs in this field"
Here a bit of paraphrased this site:
http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JTE/v23n1/hall.html



Anyway, to say still more concisely it would be just saying that there is a "shortage" of teachers due to the field (the prospects of it) no being alluring at all.


To me, to put "apagão" and "escassez" in the same sentence it will involve some level of explanation afterwards, since you can´t mean "shortage" for both. There will a slight difference there.

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Ah, I just found another word to define it better, just what you wanted (I think).

"Brain drain"

You would think, but brain drain is about high qualified people that move to another place seeking better opportunities in life.


Not so fast! See that definition.
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/brain%20drain

: the departure of educated or professional people from one country, economic sector, or field for another usually for better pay or living conditions.


http://www.thefreedictionary.com/brain+drain
brain drain
n.
The loss of skilled intellectual and technical labor through the movement of such labor to more favorable geographic, economic, or professional environments.



http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/ ... 926579.htm
Hanging up their labcoats: Australia's new brain drain




Or you may preffer ''The exodus from the classroom is worse than the shortage of teachers" I think this would sum up what you initially thought. ;)