Como dizer "tempo suficiente" em inglês

Avatar do usuário rafaelisquierdo 185 6
Olá galera,

Hoje no trabalho conversando com um Americano via comunicador de texto interno da empresa, tipo MSN e ICQ, perguntei a ele se nossa equipe estava indo bem com as datas e prazos(tempo) para as entregas do projeto. Ele respondeu com a expressão "You guys are cutting it fine".

Significado:
to only leave yourself just enough time to do something

Exemplos de uso:
Only allowing half an hour to get from the station to the airport is cutting it fine, isn't it?

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Avatar do usuário Breckenfeld 4465 11 99
I think that to cut it fine means that you procrastinate too much until there's barely any time left to do it.

Ou seja, o americano quis dizer que o pessoal daqui deixa tudo para a última hora (mania de brasileiro).


Bye!
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Avatar do usuário Eve.SP 550 5 10
Olá Rafael,

Gostaria de fazer uma pergunta sobre este termo. Ele não teria, de certo modo, uma conotação negativa (talvez uma crítica bem sutil)?

Verifiquei o significado de 'cut it/things fine' em alguns dicionários e encontrei o seguinte:

1) "to allow very little time for something" She arrived ten minutes before her flight, so she was cutting it a bit fine. (Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary)

2) "cut fine, to calculate precisely, especially without allowing for possible error or accident: To finish in ten minutes is to cut it too fine. (dictionary.com)

3) "to give yourself only a very short amount of time to do something" (macmillandictionary.com)

Pergunto por curiosidade mesmo.

Obrigada,
Avatar do usuário PPAULO 43405 6 33 763
Good one, it was novelty for me!


http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/i ... +fine.html
If you cut it fine, you only just manage to do something- at the very last moment. 'Cut things fine' is the same. 'Cut it a bit fine' is a common variation.




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Most of time it have a slight negative connotation, but then, sometimes not. As per definition 2) from the above answer.
Many times, with a relieved ring to it.


Here a bit of "close shave" or "in the nick of the time" effect:


http://britishexpats.com/forum/new-zeal ... ne-605809/
Hello All,

Right then - here's our story:

We put our EOI (with job offer) in December and were sent the ITA on 16th February. We have got all the information requested (medicals, reference etc) and have just been waiting on the contract of employment from the chap in Auckland.
We have been waiting and waiting and getting more and more stressed as we're nearly at the 3 month deadline!! My husband has spoken to his employer in NZ today and he is coming to the UK in May and wants to meet my hubby and give him the contract then (a nice personal touch) - although cutting it VERY fine!!
They have arranged to meet on 12th May which means that we will send it, along with all other ITA stuff next day delivery to immigration in London - 2 days before the deadline!!!

Just to complicate things a little more we are hoping to leave the UK mid-June (13th) and fly to NZ to start our new life - we have a baby arriving in August so dont want to leave it much later to fly out.

Do you think there's any chance that our visa will be approved in 4 weeks???!!!!!!!!

Arghhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Indeed the girl is happy and surprised (and relieved as well...) Talk about cutting it fine! (pense numa situação boa que aconteceu em cima da hora, no último minuto!)



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Anyway it´s about (just the) "tempo suficente" to something happen, or to work out (avoid a bigger) a problem etc.

Supermarkets are the genii of the logistics game: barcodes going through the checkout enable a precision-picture of the state of the shelves in any given outlet and trip the switch for incoming orders, which arrive ‘just in time’: the process is so finely tuned that most of the warehousing a supermarket chain requires can be handled by a fleet of lorries plying our motorways round the clock. In the new thinking, this is cutting it fine, like only ever refilling the tank of your car with a couple of litres: it works as long as there’s nothing you hadn’t thought of, but it also means that Britain is never much further than ‘nine meals from anarchy’, as Andrew Simms, head of the New Economics Foundation, put it.
Avatar do usuário rafaelisquierdo 185 6
Hi Eve.SP,

I do not disagree with you. Something it sounds a little bit negative depending on how it is used. However, as PPAULO said sometimes it does not.

Nice discussion guys!