Como dizer "Armadilha" em inglês

Hi, there.
Don't go, it is a armadilha !!
He want to see you again !!


How can I say ARMADILHA in English ?

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14 respostas
Donay Mendonça 23 108 1.6k
>> Trap

Be careful, it's a trap!
Daniel.S 1 2 7
também: ambush / ambuscade
Marcio_Farias 1 24 213
Alejandra escreveu:[...] He want to see you again! [...]
He wants...
Jerry Dorien 4 46
Alguns outros tipos de "armadilha"

booby trap
armadilha (pra pregar peça em alguém)
armadilha (esplosiva)

pitfall
armadilha (cilada)

all the best
Jerry Dorien 4 46
Também,

ambush

armadilha (emboscada)

see you !!!
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Thomas 7 61 291
I think "set-up" and "frame" would work too. Usually the terms refer to crimes. False evidence is created to cast suspicion on an innocent party.

It was a set-up. I was set-up.
I was framed for the crime.
Adriano Japan 2 20
*Adding:

tripwirea piece of wire that is attached to something such as a gun or a camera and operates it when someone touches or pulls the wire
Thomas escreveu:I think "set-up" and "frame" would work too. Usually the terms refer to crimes. False evidence is created to cast suspicion on an innocent party.

It was a set-up. I was set-up.
I was framed for the crime.
Setup é usado como verbo para dizer " eles armaram uma armadilha para nos"?
Ficaria assim they setup for us,they will frame for me ?
Setup é o substantivo (armadilha). Por exemplo, it was a setup (era uma uma armadilha). O verbo é "set someone up" ou "frame someone" (sem "for"). Por exemplo, "his friends set him up" (fizeram uma pegadinha), "we were set up" etc., ou "I was framed", "the defendant believed he had been framed" etc. Espero ter ajudado, Vitor.
Então ainda não me responde.
Como fica a tradução?

Nós vamos ter que armar uma armadilha para eles.(Usando setup)
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Donay Mendonça 23 108 1.6k
Com "set somebody up", sugiro a seguinte forma:

Nós vamos ter que armar uma armadilha para eles.
We'll have to set them up.

Those aren't his drugs. Someone must have set him up! [Merriam-webster]
Aquelas drogas não são dele. Alguém deve ter feito uma armadilha (= armado) para ele.

Bons estudos. Compartilhe.
Oh guy, that's a trap.
Então setup seria mais o substantivo acompanhado pelo to be?

It's setup for us.
it was setup for me.
that must be setup for him.
PPAULO 6 48 1.2k
https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/l ... sh.560588/
There was a "vertical" influence, in 1066. Overnight, the entire ruling class had Norman French as its first language. Hence the duplicate vocabulary when animals looked after by Anglo Saxon speaking serfs were processed into food eaten by their superiors. The same double vocabulary goes right through the language - for example "better/worse" and "superior/inferior", "come/go" and "arrive/depart", etc, etc.

There was a second wave of frenchification and italianization in the 1600s, when French/Italian culture was perceived to be "better" than English - though there was a later backlash against this led by people like Samuel Johnson (the dictionary guy) who complained that English was being trashed by bad Latin grammar mixed with bad French vocabulary. (And they were right, in the sense that the early English dictionaries included words like "abequitation" meaning "the act of riding away on horseback" (!!!)

The "1066 effect" still survives in different speech patterns between the north and south of England. The southern vocabulary is much more "latin-frenchified" than the northern.

Also, from the fall of the Roman empire up to 1066, Anglo-Saxon, the Celtic languages, and Norse were all in parallel use in different parts of Britain, which most definitely was NOT a "united kingdom" at that time.




Where I am getting at?
Until now when there´s a perceived more English word than a Latin one (or if one wish to say, a French, a Portuguese etc) they choose the former over the latter.



Ambush being English would take precedence over ambuscade, most of the time.
Not a no-no, but it´s a case of possibility.


Of course, one seeing this:

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?c ... de%3B%2Cc0

would think that "ambuscade" is getting fashionable again; but then, the search is crawls within Google Books where perhaps authors want to display their brain prowess.



Using the Google Search we see that "ambush" is way more usual.