"Keep with" x "Keep up with": Como utilizar

Avatar do usuário Marcio_Farias 12440 1 22 210
Qual destas duas versões da mesma frase aparece com mais frequência no inglês?

"Joe couldn't keep with the other guys on the hike" ou
"Joe couldn't keep up with the other guys..."?

O meu Webster's diz que keep with = keep up with, pelo menos neste caso.

Alguém tem opinião diferente?
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Avatar do usuário Thomas 14450 7 58 286
"Joe couldn't keep with the other guys on the hike"
Márcio, this sounds odd to me. Without further context, I understand it to men "to remain with". But even that sounds strange. Did the other guys take HIKE A and he took HIKE B? Did the others camp in one place and he in another? If the speaker is making reference to speed on the same hike, he is doing a poor job of it.

"Joe couldn't keep up with the other guys..."?
In this sentence, the meaning is very clear. Joe was unable to maintain the faster speed of other other guys on the hike. The other guys hiked faster than he could, and he fell behind.

In answer to your question, the second sentence is does a much better job of expressing the idea that Joe could not hike at the higher speed of his companions.
Avatar do usuário Marcio_Farias 12440 1 22 210
Thomas, thank you. I might consider discrediting my dictionary definition of keep with with the sense of keep up with. After all, as dictionaries grow old so, of course, do lexicographic definitions.
Avatar do usuário Thomas 14450 7 58 286
You should do a post about your new signature! Are you aware it begins with "You have the right to remain silent...."? I should have Mirandized my last girlfriend.

Márcio, check out that phrase in other dictionaries. To my uneducated caipira-polo-medio pelo-bumpkin ears, it means "to remain with" and does not imply a difference of speeds.

Have you heard the expression "to keep up with the Joneses"? It means to buy and possess everything that everyone else has, regardless of how destructive the quest becomes. If your neighbors buy a new car, you buy one. If they fly to Mallorca for the weekend, you fly to the Greek Islands for the day. Hai capito?
Avatar do usuário Marcio_Farias 12440 1 22 210
Yes, Thomas, I did. I saw it on a Mad magazine. Mad went on to describe humorously the hell a neighbor had to go through in order to keep up with the Joneses, his neighbor across the street. I don't remember the whole story, but I laughed through the mag as I turned the pages. I haven't read a Mad magazine in years, though.
Avatar do usuário Daniel Reis 955 1 15
Olá pessoal,

Queria saber qual a melhor tradução para a frase do Marcio: "Joe couldn't keep up with the other guys..."?

Valeus
Avatar do usuário Donay Mendonça 53290 21 86 1248
Sugestão:

Joe couldn't keep up with the other guys.
Joe não conseguia se manter no mesmo ritmo dos outros.
Joe não conseguia acompanhar os outros.

Definição: to do whatever is necessary to stay level or equal with someone or something. [Cambridge]

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