"Dying (your) hair blue...", como explicar?

Pessoal,

Tenho a impressão que a frase "tingir o cabelo de azul..." em inglês não varie muito. Então teríamos "dying (your) hair blue...".

Sei que algumas expressões em inglês não podem fugir de algumas estruturas, tipo essa parte do "dying (your)". Agora, como eu explico o porquê disto? Por que "tingir o cabelo" não é simplesmente "dying hair blue" ou "dying the hair blue"? Obrigatoriamente tem que ter um objeto ali?! Senão fica parecendo, pra quem não tem muito contato com a língua, que "dying your hair blue" significa "pintar seu cabelo de azul".

Alguma explicação razoável? Fazem sentido as coisas que afirmei?

Obrigado!!

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6 respostas
PPAULO 6 48 1.2k
Sometimes we have to think in a new way before the use of some structure.

Let´s think of "dying hair blue..." it would talk about "pintar cabelo azul (digamos um cabelo é azul e você vai explicar sobre pintar ele de alguma outra cor...). It´s worth that blue "adjectives" hair. One could begin instructions as how to dye hair blue with another hue.

Another grammar aside: when we use "dye your hair blue" is that we mean dying our hair, in contrast to dying the hair of someone else.
PPAULO 6 48 1.2k
Sometimes we have to think in a new way before the use of some structure.

Let´s think of "dying hair blue..." it would talk about "pintar cabelo azul (digamos um cabelo é azul e você vai explicar sobre pintar ele de alguma outra cor...). It´s worth that blue "adjectives" hair. One could begin instructions as how to dye hair blue with another hue.

Another grammar aside: when we use "dye your hair blue" is that we mean dying our hair, as opposed to dying the hair of someone else. That happens because internet text titles focus on your, your needs, we are attracted to articles in terms of "I": Oh, I have my hair dyed another collor, and I want it blue, when he says dyes your hair blue, he is talking to me!
Hi, PPAULO!

Thanks for the reply, I really appreciate it. However, I'm still having trouble trying to transmit this idea as logically as I can in Portuguese, but I can't seem to get there. It's some sort of grey area, I don't remember ever studying this particular structure in English, and it's hard to find a good explanation for it. I know there are things we can't explain really explain 'cause it's a whole other language, but still...

Are there any grammar aficionados here that you know of? ;)
PPAULO 6 48 1.2k
Okay then, let´s get back to the drawing board.

The entry "dye" from the Collins Dictionary has two examples to illustrate its use:
The women prepared, spun and dyed the wool.
We can take it from the context that the women were the agent (the ones that perform the action). Anyway, it´s a
Common thing to use "dyed" to indicate that, the subject is a doer/performer of the action.

She had dyed black hair.
Okay, here it seems like they use it meaning "she had dyed her hair black", so it´s acceptable (not usual) to use it in this sense. But feel free to.

Dying (possessive pronoun) + hair + color is a fixed expression of sorts, a grammar convention [1]
[1]Convention - Conventions are the formally and informally agreed-upon ways we use language.

In the following headline "28 celebrities that look almost unrecognizable after dyeing their hair platinum blonde." it´s agreed that said celebrities "dyed hair platinum blonde" but more often than not you will read it with the adjective possessive.

"dying hair blue" would depend on context, and just using the possessive saves explanation or editing in some cases.

Finally, I don´t know a grammar aficionado/grammar buff around here or elsewhere, but I know lots of people into English that do their conscientiously best to give some answer up to the standard of the question-asker.
We know that one doesn´t necessarily need a degree to help others out, but a degree of care. ;-) Let´s wait then for more comments on this one, they are always welcome.
Wow, amazing answer, PPAULO! That surely is gonna help me a lot!

By the way, I never meant to underestimate your answer or your efforts, and I hope you haven't taken it that way. I asked about any grammar aficionados here 'cause maybe my question fitted exactly their interest or field of expertise and you wouldn't have to spend time trying to explain me a different way. But so you did and you ended up nailing it!

Thanks again! :D
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PPAULO 6 48 1.2k
Thanks for your feedback, you are welcome. I apologize for any misinterpretation on my part, it´s the noises in the communication! Written communication sometimes doesn´t convey everything we mean.
Anyway, things clarified, I am glad that it was of help. And if you have any follow up questions, just shout! Don´t get stuck with doubts only to please the respondent. ;-) :-)