Como dizer "tenho preguiça de" em inglês

Denise Toronto
Como dizer "Tenho preguiça de encher a banheira porque demora muito".
14 respostas
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Gustavo Sena 190 4
Olá Denise!
Eu neste caso diria:
"It takes me too long to fill the bath, and I'm too lazy for it"
Leva muito tempo para eu encher a banheira e eu sou muito preguiçoso para isto.
Esperemos por outras recomendações e sugestões.

I hope I've helped
Gustavo

Carls 3205 2 75
My suggestion:

Como dizer "Tenho preguiça de encher a banheira porque demora muito".
I'm (too) lazy to fill the bathtub with water because it takes too long

Thomas 14750 7 59 287
It takes too long to fill the tub, and I'n not in the mood to wait.
I don't feel like waiting around for the tub to fill.

Too direct a translation is not going to give a good translation. "Ter perguiça de" does not seem to translate well.

Henry Cunha 10190 3 16 182
I'm not sure impatience and laziness are the same thing here.

Marcio_Farias 12580 1 23 212
É melhor vender a banheira e passar a tomar banho de chuveiro.

Thomas 14750 7 59 287
You could be right, Henry, but I thnk that impatience in these contexts works fine for perguiça.
Laziness, per Mssrs. Merriam and Webster, refers to the avoidance of phyical/mental exertion. Eactly what exertion is required to wait for a tub to fill? Patience? Yes. Exertion? No. When laziness replaces perguiça in these sentences, it simply doesn't sound right. And there must be a reason for it. Is it our goal to make a literal translation, or is it to come up with an equivalent that fits the second language and its culture?

I'm going to take a shower.

Henry Cunha 10190 3 16 182
Thomas, I guess we will have to wait patiently for Denise's reaction. (Rsrs)

(Meantime watch out for that crazy spelling: preguiça) (more rsrs)

In Portuguese we "have" laziness (temos preguiça). In English we "are" lazy.
However, in Portuguese we can switch to "Eu sou preguiçoso," which in English is still "I am lazy." I guess you can't "have" it in English; you must "be" it. Go figure.

Donay Mendonça 62350 22 99 1512

Rodzilla 30
Thomas escreveu:You could be right, Henry, but I thnk that impatience in these contexts works fine for perguiça.
Laziness, per Mssrs. Merriam and Webster, refers to the avoidance of phyical/mental exertion. Eactly what exertion is required to wait for a tub to fill? Patience? Yes. Exertion? No. When laziness replaces perguiça in these sentences, it simply doesn't sound right. And there must be a reason for it. Is it our goal to make a literal translation, or is it to come up with an equivalent that fits the second language and its culture?

I'm going to take a shower.
I agree with you, Thomas. Although I would have never thought of it by myself, it does make a lot of sense. One can't be Lazy to feel the tub, because there's no effort other than opening the tap and letting the water run, and waiting. Impatience seems to fit A LOT better.

Although, now I'm thinking about, in Portuguese I can understand her words, but I think I (personally) would probably say that "não tenho paciência para esperar a banheira encher". But thinking quickly, it also seems to me that "preguiça" and "impatience" are often switched between each other without any harm.
Henry Cunha escreveu:Thomas, I guess we will have to wait patiently for Denise's reaction. (Rsrs)

(Meantime watch out for that crazy spelling: preguiça) (more rsrs)

In Portuguese we "have" laziness (temos preguiça). In English we "are" lazy.
However, in Portuguese we can switch to "Eu sou preguiçoso," which in English is still "I am lazy." I guess you can't "have" it in English; you must "be" it. Go figure.
in Portuguese, we are lazy aswell, just like you said. The thing is, we have two verbs to define 'to be'. One to define something that's part of us (ser) and another one to say how we are in the moment (estar), in English when you need to be clear about the second one, the construction changes. In this case "ter preguiça" actually means "estar preguiçoso", which I think would be better translated to English as "feeling lazy".

Marcio_Farias 12580 1 23 212
Thomas escreveu:[...] per Mssrs. Merriam and Webster,[...]
Thomas, what does the "Mssrs." part stand for?

Thomas 14750 7 59 287
I guess I "tinha preguiça demais" to write preguiça correctly, Henry. LOL Without a doubt, some Portunhol crept into my vocabulary (preguiça/perezoso).

That sure got me into trouble in Argentina. Without thinking, I used a very innocent Gaúcho word. As soon as it left my mouth, I thought, "Crud! I've screwed up!" The word was innocent in RGS, but it was a palavrão in Argentina.

Buen día e me espalho. Isn't that what Eric wrote? rsrsrs

Denise Toronto
Muito obrigada por todas as respostas!

Denise Toronto
A pergunta foi em relação à preguiça mesmo porque tem que ficar tomando conta da baheira para não transbordar. Grata pelas respostas!

PPAULO 57845 6 43 1030
My twopence´s worth:

It takes ages to fill the tub, I just can´t put up with the waiting.
It takes ages to fill the tub, I just can´t stand waiting there (*), looking to the water get all the way up the tub walls.

Could be (*) "I just can´t stand waiting there anymore." Meaning that you did, when you were young, or when you just bought the tub, when it was a novelty!