Como poderia falar que alguma coisa está acabada?

Gostaria de saber como falo que alguém ou algo está "acabado" no sentido físico da palavra, como quando alguém está cansado, ou determinado objeto está quebrado ou surrado.

Frase de exemplo: "This fence looks word"

Desde já, aradeço pela colaboração!
Tenha um bom dia!

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Complementando!

There are many ways to say that, and the words you mentioned "quebrado", "acabado", "surrado", are different in English.
Look:

Broken - worn - fall apart - collapse

(and so on)

Examples:
"This fence looks broken."
"This fence looks worn."
"This fence looks worn and broken." (that's my favorite)
"This fence is falling apart." In Portuguese: "caindo aos pedaços."
"This fence has collapsed."


The right word depends on what you want to say.
My opinion OK! There are many other ways though.

Cheers!
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6 48 1.1k
"a fence in a state of disrepair" would do. Meaning - a fence with areas in need of fixing, or the entire fence itself.
Another way to express that would be "a deteriorating fence".
6 48 1.1k
Well done. Good job, Cinnamon. I would upvote if I had not spent my 'estalecas' - my daily share of votes. :-)
O mais comum é "is over"
"I'm so sorry, but the party is over"
Sinto muito, mas a festa acabou.
6 48 1.1k
In other situations that´s okay, Bruney. Not always though.
I had my fair share of teacher saying "has everyone finished the exercise? Fine, let´s go on."
With 'fence' in the sense of being in a state of disrepair - as I pointed out, it would be those ways we have come up with.

But, yes, in the sense of the "duration of an event", let´s illustrate with a party or a wedding, when it comes to its end, we can say it´s over. The same can be said by someone when they are going to stop some kind of wrongdoing.

In the case of "party is over" it can be said metaphorically as well, meaning that "anything you are having fun with ends now, ends here".

Context is everything, if you are visiting a relative in a hospital and you visiting hours and you are "overstaying your visit" (plus the nurse may be overloaded and might be a bit strict) you must be warned "your time is up". Again, it goes with context.