Correções de Textos: Student exchange dilemma

I've been living in Dublin for almost 3 months and has been a amazing experience despite the huge Brazilian community we have here. Every Brazilian student had chose Dublin for personal reason, some of them might had chosen Dublin because it's one of the countries where work and study is allowed and you don't have to face a lot of bureaucracy to get the visa.

Dublin has a range of cheap English schools and the cost of life here is one of the cheapest comparing with London, Australia or others destinies that exchange students might choose. Another good point is Dublin is located in Europe, so you can travel abroad during your holidays and it's likely you will spend the half of money you would spent if you were taking off from Brazil.

Even though Dublin has some negative points, as I mentioned before, we have a big community of Latin people here, so it's easiest speak Portuguese or Spanish all the time instead of English.

When you move for a different country, it's common you try to live with people of your own nationality, this makes you feel safe and security, specially when you cannot speak English fluently.

It can be handling to live with other Brazilians, it's likely will be your Brazilian friend who will help you to find a place to live, opening your bank account and finding your first job. Even if you get homesick, it's better have someone to share your feelings on your own language.

However, it's also controversial when you move to a country to learn the local language and after few weeks you just realize you've been speaking more your native language than English. I have to say that getting over our fears it's not a easy thing to achieve. My first weeks here were terrible, specially because the Irish accent it's hard to catch and they speak very fast adding some local slang, which don't make the things easier for internationals students.

I've known some people who are living here for years and don't speak English properly because they are surrounded by Brazilians all the time, in my opinion this is a waste of time and money. I think it's important to have Brazilians friends to help you in some emergency but if you move abroad and you have a goal, you must to use all your resources to achieve it.

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Avatar do usuário Telma Regina 22725 9 58 570
These are my corrections to your text:

I've been living in Dublin for almost 3 months and it has been an amazing experience despite the huge Brazilian community we have here. Every Brazilian student had chose Dublin for personal reasons, some of them might had chosen Dublin because it's one of the countries where work and study are allowed and you don't have to face a lot of bureaucracy to get the visa.

Dublin has a range of *cheaper English schools and the cost of living here is one of the cheapest comparing to London, Australia or other destinies that exchange students might choose. Another good point is that Dublin is located in Europe, so you can travel abroad during your holidays and it's likely you will spend the half of the money you would spend if you were taking off from Brazil.

Even though Dublin has some negative points, as I mentioned before, it has a large Latin people community here, so it's easier to speak to Portuguese or Spanish all the time instead of English.

When you move to a different country, it's common you try to live with people of your own nationality, this makes you feel safe and secure, specially when you cannot speak English fluently.

It can be simpler to live with other Brazilians, it's likely it will be your Brazilian friend who will help you to find a place to live, opening your bank account, and finding your first job. Even if you get homesick, it's better to have someone to share your feelings in your own language.

However, it's also controversial when you move to a country to learn the local language and after a few weeks you just realize you've been speaking more your native language than English. I have to say that getting over our fears is not a easy thing to do. My first weeks here were terrible, specially because the Irish accent is hard to catch and they speak very fast adding some local slang, which don't make the things easier for internationals students.

I've met some people who are living here for years and don't speak English properly because they are surrounded by Brazilians all the time, in my opinion this is a waste of time and money. I think it's important to have Brazilian friends to help you in some emergency, but if you move abroad and you have a goal, you must to use all your resources to achieve it.

*There is a subtle difference between "cheap" and "cheaper" here.
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Avatar do usuário PPAULO 39205 6 32 684
Dublin has a range of cheap English schools and the cost of life here is one of the cheapest comparing with London, Australia or others destinies that exchange students might choose.



I would redo that boldened bit. Not to be misunderstood as "cheap" in the sense of "inexpensive because of inferior quality".
So, perhaps you find it interesting to change it into "Dublin has a range of cheap, yet reliable schools" or "Dublin has a range of reliable, cheap schools." etc.
Just to soft the "cheap" statement. ;)
It´s me, though, others may think otherwise. There is the context afterwards, it compares the Dublin living expenses with that of London, Australia.
Avatar do usuário Juliana Rios 18850 21 98 389
A palavra "destino" desmembra-se em duas quando traduzida para o inglês. Vale atentar à diferença:

Destiny = Conjunto de acontecimentos inevitáveis pertencentes ao futuro.
Destination = Local para o qual se vai (em uma viagem etc.)

"...comparing to London, Australia or others destinations that exchange students might choose."

You can always choose your destination, but you can't always choose your destiny.