Como dizer "pro cachorro não sair" em inglês

Como dizer "pro cachorro não sair" em inglês
1
Como dizer "Feche o portão pro cachorro não sair" em inglês?

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I like Juliana's answer.

I would suggest "to get out" (assuming the dog is still in an enclosed area - and that includes being out of the kennel but still in the yard or general area of the owner's house). Or "to get away" (it doesn't matter where the dog is). "To escape" is certainly possible, but personally I would not choose it. It implies that the dog was being held prisoner, kept against his will. And it sounds formal although clearly used in an informal setting.

"To shut" and "to close" have the same basic meaning. Shut the gate./Close the gate.

Here is what Merriam-Webster has to say about kennels:
1.
A (1) : a house for a dog or pack of hounds (2) : an establishment for the breeding or boarding of dogs — usually used in plural
B : a house or other dwelling place regarded as unfit for human residence

2.
A : a pack of dogs or other animals
B : a group of persons
<literary agent who has a kennel of eccentric clients — Martin Levin>

3.
A : a bed or den of an animal (as a fox or otter)

4.
A : gable 2b
I have never kept dogs in an enclosure, but I was surprised to read in M-W: "a house for a dog or pack of hounds". I call an fenced enclosure a "kennel" but a house for a dog is "a dog house".
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Sugestões:

Close the gate so the dog doesn't get out.
Close the gate so the dog doesn't escape.
1
Juliana Rios escreveu:Sugestões:

Close the gate so the dog doesn't get out.
Close the gate so the dog doesn't escape.
Are you sure Juliana? It doens't sound good to me. Imagine the dog just escaped from the kennel and I scream to my son "corra e feche o portão pro cachorro não sair". That's the context.
1 17
Olá,

Talvez usando o ''so that'' ?

Ex: Close the gate so that the dog doesn't get out(escape).

Valeus
6 48 1.1k
My tack on it:

Will you shut the door please, or the dog is going to run away.
Will you shut the door please, or else the dog is going to run away from home.
Will you shut the door please, or he/she will get out/go out.


It seems like the dog might be trained to come in and out, though. And not simply bolt out and be in danger. He/she should be free to go in and out, but not getting himself/herself into trouble.
http://visihow.com/Train_Your_Dog_Not_t ... or_or_Gate
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/pets/d ... unaway-dog


Referring to a dog "escape" sounds fine to me, when talking about an event that happened. In this case, I would use the above expressions. Why? because I am not a hundred certain about using "escape" there. Perhaps is a bit more formal and not much used in colloquial/spoken language; but again, it´s me, just an impression of mine.